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Vegetation structure of the biomes in southwestern Africa And their precipitation patterns

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Title

Vegetation structure of the biomes in southwestern Africa And their precipitation patterns

Subject

African study monographs. Supplementary issue (2010), 40:
77-89

Description

Southwestern Africa contains diverse biomes. The amount of the annual precipitation of this area has been traditionally thought to be the most important controlling factor to the differentiation of the biomes. However, this territory experiences the summer rain type and winter rain type. Those two different precipitation patterns should result in the different mechanisms to control the distribution of the biomes. This study intends to clarify the relationships between the distribution of the biomes and the summer rain type and winter rain type, knowing the vegetation structure in terms of the growth forms of the dominant plants. Studies were conducted in the area southwestern Africa, including major biomes of the southern Africa. Grassland, Nama-karoo and Savanna appear in the area with the summer rain type. Both of Succulent karoo and Fynbos appear in the area with the winter precipitation type. The amount of winter precipitation of those two biomes is much higher than that of the other tree biomes. This higher amount of winter precipitation encourages the dominance of evergreen woods and succulents in those two biomes. Especially the succulents efficiently utilize the winter precipitation. This leads to the dominance of the succulents on those two biomes.

Creator

Susumu OKITSU

Publisher

African study monographs. Supplementary issue (2010), 40:
77-89

Date

2010

Contributor

Bernard C. Moore

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

Journal Article

Files

Collection

Citation

Susumu OKITSU, “Vegetation structure of the biomes in southwestern Africa And their precipitation patterns,” Namibia Digital Repository, accessed September 20, 2018, http://namibia.leadr.msu.edu/items/show/280.

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